Bedales connection: 6 February 1918, Royal Assent to the Representation of The People Act

1911d Amy Garrett BadleyBy Ruth Whiting, Head of History, 1963-2000

On this day, I believe, Amy Garrett Badley was torn in two directions.  On the one hand she was delighted that, after years of struggle, she and other women of her age and status would have full voting rights in the election due to take place in 1919.  On the downside, however, she was determined to continue the fight so that all women would gain the rights granted by the Act to men of 21 years and over.

In 1935, receiving the testimonial book from ‘The Petersfield Society for Woman Suffrage and Equal Citizenship’ (view an extract image here), she herself said that she “was proud to be a member of a family many of whose members had worked for the same great cause, and she would have been ashamed if she had not tried to follow in their footsteps”.  She was referring to Elizabeth Garrett, in 1865 the first woman to gain medical qualifications in Britain, her own half-sister Rhoda and cousin Agnes who had been, in 1875, the first women to found and run an interior decorating business (A & R Garrett of 2 Gower Street) and, perhaps most of all, Elizabeth’s and Agnes’s youngest sister, Millicent, who for about 40 years had been the leader of the suffragists, the NUWSS.

Bedales, not just Amy, had played its part in advocating the cause of equal rights for women. Students (especially in 1907 and 1908) held heated debates, usually carried by an overwhelming majority of boys as well as girls, demanding votes for women.  Girls from Bedales took part in the famous marches which traversed London, (February 1907, the “Mud” March, and July 1908, which gained greater support from the crowds).

Garden Parties were held in Bedales grounds where speeches were delivered by luminaries who supported the movement, the most celebrated being in 1911 and 1913. In 1914 in the sitting room in The Wing, talks were given to “working women of Steep and Petersfield, many of whom themselves (or their husbands) worked for the school.  They started the series with 13 members and by July, when Amy wrote about if The Bedales Chronicle, there were 40 attenders, including some of the husbands!

The more I look at Amy’s support for the cause the more complicated it becomes: certainly by 1912 she had developed quite a lot of support for the militants which was causing The Chief some concern.  On census day 1911, filling in the return for the female staff house (Foxcot) she conspired to hide Dora Hooper, the wife of the Art Master, from the Enumerator.  Boldly across the form she wrote “No Vote, No Census. “Government must rest upon the consent of the Governed.”: it was signed Amy Garrett Badley, Dora Hooper.  Someone betrayed them and Dora’s name was added to the form, in red ink, “by Registrar General’s authority”.  I believe she had asked her husband not to include her in the school return.  It starts with JHB and  their son, then servants, teaching staff and all the students still at school that night (term had ended on Saturday)  At the end in Mr Badley’s handwriting, was added, “Amy Garrett Badley, wife, 47 married 18 years, 1 child, still living in 1911” precisely the information she had intended to deny the Registrar General.

This is a research project in progress: when I get a little relief from my researches in OBs who died in WW1 (7 in the next 8 weeks), I will return to this fascinating story.

Jaw: challenging extremism

Dr. Usama Hasan, Senior Researcher in Islamic Studies at the Quilliam Foundation, the counter-extremism think tank, delivered the Bedales Jaw on Wednesday 3 February.

Usama talked about the goals and successes of the Foundation as well as his own personal history. Having grown up as Muslim in England, Usama explained how many people had treated him unfairly purely based on his devotion to his religion. Despite this, Usama graduated from top universities (London and Cambridge) and became a leading scientist gaining an MSc, MA and PhD in Theoretical Physics and Artificial Intelligence.

Usama talked openly about his past as one of the leaders of the Salafi Islamic movement; he and many of his men fought in Afghanistan and Bosnia during the 1990s. Returning to the UK, Usama published a series of essays and academic papers that address Islam, law, equality, scientific ethics and human rights as well as joining with the Quilliam Foundation to challenge extremism.

After the talk, a group of students joined Usama for dinner where discussion focussed on tackling Islamophobia through media, gender equality within religion and the rising tension between the Israelis and Palestinians. Overall, Usama broadened our knowledge on a variety of topics whilst managing to explain the different perspectives between extremist and pacifist Muslims.

By Athen Brady, Block 5

An audience with Shami Chakrabarti

GIA_Bedales_Shami_Jan16_0037

This year’s annual Global Awareness lecture was delivered to a packed Quad by the outgoing director of Liberty, Shami Chakrabarti, who focussed on the challenges facing human rights in the UK. She spoke about the need to protect the rights to privacy and free speech against governments and individuals, with emphasis on the current rhetoric about abolishing the Human Rights Act. Having rapidly got the measure of her audience (“Radio 4 and quinoa”) she spoke compellingly about the internet as ‘”the new frontier” for Human Rights, deftly illustrating how differently we would feel if it was suggested that a record was kept of every physical site we visited – every shop, every hotel, every airport. In her question and answer session she dealt with questions ranging from why she was called ‘the most dangerous woman in Britain’ by The Sun, to her (unfavourable) view on Donald Trump: ‘terrifying’.

We are indebted both to Shami and to the Bedales Association, whose generous grant has made this lecture series possible. View a short film of the students’ discussion with Shami here.

By Ruben Brooke, 6.2