Jaw: a spring term round-up

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By Alastair Harden, Teacher of Classics

The spring term’s Jaw programme opened with an address by Clive Case, Senior Chaplain of Charterhouse. Taking on a theme which has been on everyone’s mind this year, Clive gave an engrossing, personal and thoroughly Carthusian talk on the value of silence. The following week, Al McConville and Clare Jarmy took up the theme along with several students who talked about their fantastic experience at the Plum Village Buddhist monastery and meditation retreat. Silence and mindfulness penetrate every aspect of life there, and the students were left with an appetite to bring some of this mental harmony into life at Bedales.

Student participation in Jaw has been strong this term: the annual LGBT Jaw was given by our own LGBT Society, ably steered by Will Morrison with the assistance of Olivia Bury and Aidan Hall. Putting LGBT rights into its historical perspective, they highlighted how privileged we are to be living in a time and place where everyone has the right to their own sexual orientation without fear of persecution. In February, to commemorate one hundred years of women’s suffrage, the Garrett Society under Scarlett Watkins and Rufus Seagrim addressed Blocks 3, 4 and 5 in the Lupton Hall in a passionate call-to-arms against complacence and quotidian sexist behaviours and policies.

The slot following the half-term break is the traditional place for Jaw Debate, and so it was that the motion was tabled: “This House would serve no meat”. A series of passionate addresses from the proposition, under Ellie Leonard-Biebuyck, Maisy Redmayne and Thea Sesti, were not enough to pass the motion, defeated as it was by a sober and balanced summary from Feline Charpentier following a deft rebuttal to vegetarianism from Arthur Lingham, and – the highlight of the debate – a wily and powerful address from a microphone-wielding Blossom Gottlieb, whose barnstorming debut on the Bedales floor left the audience impressed and convinced.

The spring term also sees the annual Global Awareness Jaw, an important fixture which this year is given by Miriam Mason-Sesay, the Country Director of Educaid in Sierra Leone. The Spring term will end, as always, with one of the fixtures from the Christian liturgical calendar and this year’s Passiontide service, co-organised with the Music Department, promises to continue the high standard of music which we have seen at Jaws, assemblies and concerts this year. These special services are very much in the great tradition of the old ‘Sunday Jaw’, and we’re keen to retain the practise of having hymns. So, guard your ears: there’s going to be singing…

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Refugee turned author enthrals at Bedales

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By Tess Voyle-Partington, Block 5

On Monday, Gulwali Passarlay, a former Afghan refugee who went through an extremely difficult journey to be where he is today, spoke in the theatre about his life and how he has achieved all he has, despite the barriers he faced along the way.

Gulwali began his journey as a young child in Afghanistan during the era of the Taliban. Because of the issues the Taliban presented, the country was very dangerous. In his book, The Lightless Sky, and during his talk, Gulwali explains that his mother was terrified of what would happen every time her children stepped out of the door. Even just walking to get some groceries caused worry.

To start the evening, a group of students were invited to dinner with Gulwali at Keith’s house and we were all lucky enough to have individual time with him and have a conversation before he delivered the annual Global Awareness Lecture later in the evening. During my talk with Gulwali he told me how passionate he was about the issues we are having in the UK at the moment; Brexit, young people having the vote and lots more issues he wants to raise awareness about.

After dinner, we accompanied Gulwali to the theatre,where a large number of students from the school, parents and visitors from outside of the school also attended. He began by talking about his book and going through his journey across Europe in great detail. Overall, the evening was extremely interesting and educational, notably giving many people a more in-depth insight into how refugees are treated and how we act around the controversial debate of refugees and their rights.

View Gulwali’s talk below.