Lively performances at Cecilia Concert helps raise funds

Students involved in the concert band, orchestras and choirs, as well as the soloists, performed in the annual Cecilia Concert on 25 November.

The band, conducted by Keir Rowe, opened the evening with Johnny Warrington’s Original Dixieland Concerto and lively clarinet, saxophone and trumpet solos. The Orchestra, conducted by Nick Gleed, then performed the first movement of Schubert’s mysteriously unfinished Symphony No 8. The massive crescendos and subtle diminuendos added to the piece’s haunting melody. Shanise Liang was the truly inspiring piano soloist during the second movement of Shostakovich’s Piano Concerto No. 2 with Will Lithgow conducting the Chamber Orchestra.

After a lively interval with mince pies and the annual collection for Cecily’s Fund, clarinettist Finn Carter played an intimate jazz piece with Nick Gleed accompanying on piano. The evening ended with the combined choirs singing Nick’s harmonisation of I Will Survive, followed by Parry’s well know anthem, Blest Pair of Sirens and the eight-part choral work, I was Glad. Parents, students, staff and friends of Bedales who attended the concert all enjoyed it immensely.

By Tilly Driscoll Smith, 6.2

*The Cecilia Concert was set up in memory of Old Bedalian, Cecily Eastwood. More than £14,000 has already been raised in support of Cecily’s Fund, which aims to support and educate orphaned victims of aids in Zambia.

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Bedales remembers: Armistice Day

BLOG Bedales remembers - Armistice Day

Ten Bedales Sixth Form students fundraised for the Royal British Legion in Petersfield town during the Service of Remembrance on 8 November. The service was led by The Reverend Will Hughes of St. Peter’s Church, who spoke about the sacrifices of fallen soldiers and how we may honour their memory. The service finished with wreath-laying at the war memorial. We were all delighted by the incredible generosity of everyone who donated to the Royal British Legion, and who came to pay their respects despite the cold and rain. Meanwhile, on 11 November, Michael Rice from Block 5 played bugle outside the Memorial Library to the gathered staff and student body.

By Ruben Brooke, 6.2

The Global Awareness team’s plea for help…

Christmas box

Approximately 3 million Syrians have been forced out of their country with a further 6.5 million having to leave their homes for alternative protection. The phrase ‘no one puts their children in a boat unless the water is safer than land‘ reflects the situation of the thousands of people stranded in Calais as you are reading now. We feel it is our responsibility as a comfortable community to give what aid we can, in any manner possible.The Global Awareness committee, formed of students from every year, have developed two immediate opportunities for assistance and we would very much appreciate your help. In the next half term there will be a period in which we will collect any material donations for the Syrian refugees that will then be delivered to both Syria and Calais through student-organised initiatives.

After half term our aim is create a collection of decorated shoeboxes full of a certain items which we will give to an organisation called Samaritan’s Purse who are running a campaign entitled ‘Operation Christmas Child’. Samaritan’s Purse is a religious organisation and we can guarantee that it gives ‘aid and assistance without regard to the race, creed, gender, religion or ethnicity of the beneficiaries.’ We feel that this is important to highlight. This is a link to possible items that could be featured in the boxes:

https://www.samaritans-purse.org.uk/what-we-do/operation-christmas-child/how-to-pack-a-shoebox/#gift_suggest

This includes things such as school supplies, hygiene items and toys. We would also like to ask for items of a certain level of quality. If possible please pack them over half term and bring them into school before the 15th of November. The more boxes we can get the better and if you’d like any more information please visit the website.

Additionally, a further chance to help the refugees will arise. An organisation, called Aid Convoy, have been gathering items and shipping them out directly to Syria. They are interested in clothes, tinned food, blankets, kitchen equipment, as well as other things that are on a list here. The weather will be turning soon, and spending December and January in a tent will be horrendous, so it is crucial that we do as much as we can as quickly as we can. Aid Convoy is an international humanitarian conglomerate, that is ‘committed to assisting victims of disasters and wars’. All of the supplies will be gathered into a 40 foot long container, with one having been dispatched recently (3 Oct.) As a large group of young people it is essential that we are living in awareness of the world around us, engaging, and trying to do what we can to improve it. If we remain dormant whilst those around us scream, as a generation that will soon be steering society’s moral perspective, we will be failing in doing what’s right.

http://www.aid-convoy.org.uk/items-for-container/

By Godelieve de Bree, 6.1 and the Global Awareness team

Fresh perspectives on Bedalian life

DSC_0061Malik and Noelia enjoying Badley Weekend

By Noelia Carbajal, Groton School, Massachusetts
Bedales, or England for that matter, is unlike anything I had anticipated. Perhaps because my initial suppositions were based solely on the six season Netflix series, Downton Abbey, which takes place before World War One. Though there is no one quite like Lady Mary and her sisters, Bedales and its residents were a lovely surprise. The campus is absolutely stunning. I’ve enjoyed all of my classes, especially Ancient Civilizations with Chris who took us to Butser Farm and Stonehenge. I look forward to continuing Latin throughout my school years and even taking an archaeology class someday! I’ve made so many great friends here at Bedales and I hope to stay in contact with them. Thank you!
Malik & Noelia (Groton students)

MALIK AND NOELIA (right) with their new bedales friends

By Malik Gaye, Groton School, Massachusetts
Now that my month at Bedales is coming to a close, I think my time here has been bittersweet. At first, I felt like I was sent  into a school where I knew virtually no one and especially didn’t know how to maneuver my way around the campus. The latter usually ended up with me having to retrace my steps and ask where a certain place was. But as I got used to my schedule, the people, and the general culture, I found that I was enjoying my time here. I was making friends and finally could make my way around campus on my own. As soon as I realized this, I also realized that my time here had a deadline. It’s not like I didn’t miss home and my friends because I definitely did. But it was the sense that there was so much more to experience here at Bedales and that I wouldn’t get to experience it that saddened me. I have definitely enjoyed my time here and wouldn’t change anything about it. This month has really flown by and I will miss those I have become close with. I hope that more Grotonians will have the priviledge to come and enjoy all that Bedales has to offer.

Opening of the Kadian Observatory

The Kadian Observatory was officially opened on Parents’ Day. Naveed Khalessi (Block 5), Peter Coates, Michael Truss and Thomas Harding spoke movingly about Kadian Harding, the inspiration in building the observatory, and the new opportunities for astronomy and Science exploration; Sam Harding cut the ribbon wrapped around the wonderful student-built structure. As the engraving states on the building’s brass plaque: “Kadian’s friendship was infinite like the universe.” The family has established the Kadian Observatory Fund in conjunction with the school to ensure the students’ work is maintained, treasured and utilised by present and future Bedalians. Over £17,000 has already been raised towards the target of £100,000. Find out more about the fund and how to support it, and discover more about Kadian. View photos of the opening. Read more.

The opening of the Kadian Observatory

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Bedales School is one of the UK’s top independent private co-education boarding schools. Bedales comprises three schools situated in Steep, near Petersfield, Hampshire: Dunannie (ages 3–8), Dunhurst (ages 8–13) and Bedales itself (ages 13–18). Established in 1893 Bedales School puts emphasis on the Arts, Sciences, voluntary service, pastoral care, and listening to students’ views. Bedales is acclaimed for its drama, theatre, art and music. The Headmaster is Keith Budge.

YPI winners attend London celebration

Last Tuesday, as the winners of this year’s Block 4 Youth & Philanthropy Initiative, we were lucky enough to go to London for a winner’s celebratory lunch and presentation event. We had chosen to support Stonepillow, a Chichester based charity which aids the homeless. After visiting them, delivering numerous donations, making a film and writing a song, we were presented with a £3000 cheque on behalf of the charity. Our determination and hard work was really rewarded on this special occasion. There were so many inspirational and amazing people who we felt privileged to have listened to, especially a nine year old girl affected by AVM, who had received a donation for her charity; it really showed the incredible difference that YPI makes to people’s lives. Although no prizes were given to Bedales it amazed us to see what we were capable of achieving when we put our minds to it. View photos.

By Lulu McConville and Polly Caines, Block 4

YPI winners attend London celebration

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Bedales School is one of the UK’s top independent private co-education boarding schools. Bedales comprises three schools situated in Steep, near Petersfield, Hampshire: Dunannie (ages 3–8), Dunhurst (ages 8–13) and Bedales itself (ages 13–18). Established in 1893 Bedales School puts emphasis on the Arts, Sciences, voluntary service, pastoral care, and listening to students’ views. Bedales is acclaimed for its drama, theatre, art and music. The Headmaster is Keith Budge.

Bedales Parents’ Association Silent Auction

The Silent Auction is a collection of 22 unique opportunities generously donated by the Bedales community. Items include a day’s fly fishing on the River Loddon, at the Duke of Wellington’s Estate at Stratfield Saye, an Arty Party for up to 14 children, a week in a beautiful apartment in Salcombe and ‘Glamping’ for four in the Forest of Dean. Bid online at http://interactivefundraising.co.uk/bedales/. Bidding will continue until midnight on Wednesday 2 July when the auction will close. All funds raised will go towards the new Art & Design building.

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Bedales School is one of the UK’s top independent private co-education boarding schools. Bedales comprises three schools situated in Steep, near Petersfield, Hampshire: Dunannie (ages 3–8), Dunhurst (ages 8–13) and Bedales itself (ages 13–18). Established in 1893 Bedales School puts emphasis on the Arts, Sciences, voluntary service, pastoral care, and listening to students’ views. Bedales is acclaimed for its drama, theatre, art and music. The Headmaster is Keith Budge.